A Giant

This is my submission for Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Large Subjects

_HHC2010--bws

Every little girl thinks her dad is a giant. He could lift her up to touch stars, laugh with such a force that shakes the ground, and scare monsters away just by showing them his face.

My dad was my giant… for many years.

One day when I was in junior high Dad took me to downtown by letting me ride in the back of his bike. When we reached a big hill, he started peddling hard, but it didn’t take me long to realize that he couldn’t make it to the top. How could this be possible? My dad CAN do anything!

I leaned forward, moved my body back and forth, and lifted myself off the seat… I wanted to reduce my weight so Dad could make it to the top.

After some struggling, Dad got off the bike. “You ride it to the top. I will meet you there,” he said.

This is not acceptable! Not for my giant! I stared at him, froze at the spot.

“Go. I will meet you at the top,” he said again.

I took the bike, quickly turned around and rode away. I didn’t want him seeing my tears. I didn’t want him to know that I knew that he wasn’t a giant.

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About Helen C

A retired computer programmer who loves writing and photographing, and has managed to publish a YA novel "Jin-Ling’s Two Left".
This entry was posted in Cee’s Black & White Challenge, Memoir, photo, Writing. Bookmark the permalink.

47 Responses to A Giant

  1. pike says:

    What a happy moment! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The journey children go on learning their parents are not giants is sometimes sad, like learning there is no Santa Claus.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      Dawn, I felt very sad that day. It was one of the days that I can’t forget. Then they grew older and I found out that I might have become a giant for them. 😉 Life is interesting.

      Liked by 1 person

      • It is indeed, more so I think for those of us who feel so deeply.

        Liked by 1 person

      • leannenz says:

        This touches me. My dad has always been my giant and “go to” man. Now aging is kicking in and he is struggling with health and the onset of dementia. He knows something is not right and feels helpless to do anything about it. We watch his frustration and now it us kids that have to offer the hugs and try to fill his giant shoes.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Helen C says:

          I am so sorry… but you know what? I bet your dad would tell you that he had a wonderful life and no regrets. My parents told me that.
          I know exactly what you meant. My dad was hospitalized a couple of times the year before he passed away. I felt like to pick him up and held him in my arms. I wanted o comfort him like he used to do to me when I was a kid…
          Thanks for your comment. Be strong!

          Liked by 1 person

  3. loisajay says:

    Helen, I ‘liked’ the picture and the extraordinary words you wrote. Your dad was allowing you to be the giant that day; I can see your sadness, and think he probably felt the same as you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      Thanks, Lois. I was young at the time. I thought if I wiped the tears away, Dad wouldn’t notice a thing. Now I think about this… I am not very good in hiding my emotions particularly when I am in shock. I bet my dad knew how I felt even though he didn’t say a word to me.
      Have a wonderful evening!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Sue Slaght says:

    Helen this childhood memory obviously is very strong. The realities of adulthood can definitely be heartbreaking. Thank you for sharing it. The photos is fantastic.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. sunsetdragon says:

    sweet

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Cee Neuner says:

    Such a sweet and touching story. You were definitely born with a huge heart my friend. Great photo too. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      Thanks, Cee. I wish I were smarter so I would say the right words at those situations. To the minimum, as soon as I realized he couldn’t make it to the top, I should get down and maybe even push the bike from behind. I worried if I would hurt his feelings if I jumped off the bike but… Sometime I think i’s better if I don’t think too much.
      Good night.

      Like

  7. Trudi says:

    Helen, to me you bring color to black and white. As for this post, truly spawned bittersweet memory. Thanks again. ^5

    Liked by 2 people

    • Helen C says:

      Thanks, Trudi. I am getting better in making a decision if a photo should be color or black and white, but there are still some photos that I like both ways. This is one of them 😉 Thanks for your kind words.
      Good night.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Amy says:

    A touching story, Helen. This photo tells “Every little girl thinks her dad is a giant”.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Sue says:

    Beautiful photo and story. Realizing our fathers are mortal is a troubling childhood milestone isn’t it? Thank you for sharing your experience!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. RMW says:

    Great photo and lovely story… just another milestone in growing up I guess…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      Thank you, RMW. You are right – it was a milestone… one that I wasn’t ready for at the time.
      Thanks for visiting and following my blog. I did a quick glance at your bog, and found it quite interesting. I am looking forward to reading more. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I wonder sometimes the strongest memories of our life most often dates back to our childhood days. Thanks for sharing your story with us, Helen

    Liked by 1 person

  12. treerabold says:

    Its hard to realize our heroes are only human….especially when we love them!!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. rommel says:

    Beautiful “human” story in such a short anecdote. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Robin says:

    That is a very touching and poignant story. I don’t know that I ever felt that my Dad was a giant or not a giant; but I always thought he could fix every problem in my little world and he usually did.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      Thanks, Robin. Once I wanted to get up to a tall tree. I was surprised that my dad was able to lift me up and place me on one of the tree branches. Only giant would be able to reach that tree branch, I thought 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Lignum Draco says:

    Life is filled with such moments.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Dalo 2013 says:

    Beautiful post Helen, the photo along with your words of a daughter-father love is touching and is such an important part of life.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Reblogged this on Protest the Chaos with Splashes of beauty and commented:
    @HelenC. Your post has echoed in my mind through the Summer and often since you originally posted, how often the opportunity for relationship to mature and stay the same somehow. To my readers, visit Helen’s blog and enjoy!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      Thank you so much for your kind words and reblogging. I appreciate it.
      Writing helps me connect to people I miss, believe it or not. And your comment comforts me. Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Helen, You are most welcome, I have enjoyed your faithful follow and comments over the past year or so. I know you are stepping back for more quality as opposed to quantity. Get that, also know that IMHO, you always go quality. xox Tru

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Pingback: A Giant | Protest the Chaos with Splashes of beauty

  19. My Dad was diagnosed with Parkinson’s many years ago. My Giant has been deteriorating mentally and physically before my eyes for a long time. But, he found ways to re-create that Giant status in how he deals with his everyday challenges that the disease has created as his new reality.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      I am so sorry to hear that. It must be hard for you! A year before my dad passed away, he was hospitalized. I remember seeing him curling up like a little baby. I wanted to pick him up in my arms, rocking him to comfort him. He was no longer a giant, but still, I love him so much.
      I am glad that your father found ways to recreate that Giant status. But I am sure you would agree with me that being a Giant is really not that important. We admire our dads no matter what. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  20. I really love the photo, and the expression on her face!

    Liked by 1 person

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