Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Take a New Photo

Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Take a New Photo

Cee asks us to take a new photo. Since my husband was out golfing yesterday, I decided to take a walk in downtown and see what I could find. The first thing grabbed my attention was how St. John Church was reflected in the Damon parking ramp’s window.

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Lucky me… a school band was performing.

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There were two groups of students. While one group was performing, the other group sat and watched. Apparently waiting for your turn was not as fun as performing.

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Of course, there were audiences. I didn’t know how this little boy would notice me. There were at least 12 people standing between us – we were on the opposite side of the road, and there was only a small opening for me to take the photo.

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After taking a dozen of photos, I decided to move on. And I saw this lady. I asked her if I could take a photo of her and she said yes. It was a great way to end my walk.

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Thanks for visiting my blog.

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About Helen C

A retired computer programmer who loves writing and photographing, and has managed to publish a YA novel "Jin-Ling’s Two Left".
This entry was posted in Cee’s Black & White Challenge, photo, street photo. Bookmark the permalink.

40 Responses to Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Take a New Photo

  1. Cee Neuner says:

    I sure enjoyed going on your little adventure in downtown with you. Looks like you had fun taking photos. 🙂 Much better than golfing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      Thanks, Cee. Your challenges motivate us! Believe it or not, I hadn’t gone out shooting by myself often. I didn’t think it was that much fun. And I am surprised how much I enjoyed it yesterday. Something has changed inside of me 😉 For good, I think..
      Have a great day.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Cee Neuner says:

        Photographing by myself, I find the most creative things to take. I should do it more often. I am just so used to Chris being home during the day, I rarely go out anymore and shoot without her. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Amy says:

    I love this set of photos, Helen! You captured each person’s mood, expressions,… So very well done! The lady (the last one) is graceful and beautiful through your lens. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      Good morning, Amy. You live in Houston, right? How is things around your neighborhood. Houston is in my thoughts.
      Thank you for your comments. I, actually, had a talk with myself on my way back home. When I took people’s photo at church (at Sat. Noon Meal), I felt comfortable and usually I would take several photos of the same person. But when I am on the street, even after getting the permission to take a photo, I was still nervous. And I only took one photo of this lady. Sigh. I really want to change that! 😉
      Have a great day.

      Like

      • Amy says:

        Looking through this set, I was speechless for a while. The last one should be on a photo magazine! You are a photographer, Helen.
        We are 3, 4 hours from Houston, in between San Antonio and Austin. We are fine. Thank you so much for thinking about. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  3. loisajay says:

    These photos could be the start of your own little series, Helen. I love the two girls whispering on the sidelines while waiting to perform. And that little boy–flirting with you! The last photo-beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. treerabold says:

    I really like the reflection. As always I love your photos of people. The playfulness of the little boy that caught you taking his picture and the boredom of the children watching their peers are such wonderful photos.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Mabel Kwong says:

    Love that reflection photo. So clear. The woman was very sporting to have her photo taken…did you say why you wanted to take her photo? She sure struck a great pose. Confident and she didn’t look shy one bit. Great capture 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      Thanks, Mabel. I actually walked past that lady and turned around because I really wanted a photo of her 😉 I told her she looked very pretty, which was an honest opinion. She was surprised, but then she smiled and said yes. I was so happy 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Very interesting set of photos Helen. I loved your street photography 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. rommel says:

    You are IT, Helen! You have mastered the art of taking portraits.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      Thanks, Rommel. You are very kind. I have a list of things that I need to work on. But it took me a while to know what I need to work on, so that’s an improvement! 😉

      Like

  8. sunsetdragon says:

    Great shots.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. prior says:

    Oh Helen – the first two photos are GEMS! the reflections and the whole vibe… and the P is special to me because of my name – ha!
    and the street shots are tasty good – the ending lady – has that classy feel – nice shots

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      Thanks, Yvette. I love reflections, I don’t know why.
      Now I am a little confused about your name. 😉
      Street shots are still quit a challenge for me. I asked that lady for a permission and she said yes. I don’t understand why I didn’t take time to take several photos of her. Why was I nervous after I got a permission? Oh well, that’s what I need to work on.
      Have a great day.

      Liked by 1 person

      • prior says:

        Hi H – and maybe next time you can take a few different shots – 🙂 – and as you know I am still learning too – – like the other day at the festival I was taking photos of “people taking photos” – this guy was using a selfie-stick to capture the dancing (he had it turned around to face the stage) and a different guy came up to me and started talking to me about how he was going to tell me that someone was in my photo and then he realized I was intentionally getting that shot – I smiled and lightly laughed with him – and left – but afterwards I realized that he might have been a great person to get a portrait of – so my lesson is to “stay open” to the folks that come my way while I am intentional on another project idea – maybe to stay more flexible. But I also likely was just being careful – because still need to keep our guard up for safety reasons – with phones, camera and just being a woman – even tho my hubs was with me – just need to use wisdom – 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Helen C says:

          Hello, I totally agree with you – safety is the most important thing. I am not brave at all. I would let a chance go if I don’t feel safe. It’s easier for me to take photos of strangers at events. Even then, sometime, I would pretend I was shooting something else 😉
          Deep down I am wondering if this means I am not a “true” photographer. A true photographer wouldn’t let fear stop him/her, I would think. That’s okay though. I am having fun and that’s all that counts.

          Like

          • prior says:

            oh you are a true photographer – that is for sure – and not sure we can define it really – you know – like a writer or an artist – it is something in all of us and I think there are just different expressions for the art of what we do – you know???
            and so really try to watch any thoughts like that because you have to “do what you do” and “be who you are” – I actually learned this with painting more than anything else – but I think it applies universally. And the quick version is back in 2012 I was painting at least once a week. I started to feel apprehensive because for some reason I was thinking that I had to paint technical or make it “good” – but I was losing my joy. I noticed that my favorite way to paint was simple pictures – like the ones that I would make for workshops to yeah students something. And so even though I was not teaching anymore, I just listened to my heart and kept the art quick. And so one day I was painting and those thoughts were creeping in (like I am doing thick stuff that looks elementary) but it was me – and in my head I was just saying “do what you do” – and it helped. I guess this is how I feel about poetry – I rhyme like a first grader – but it is how I personally want to play with words and convey thoughts. and so as for photos – the absolute most important thing is that you keep your essence in the process – be who you are and do what your heart feels at the time – and do not put down your work or second guess yourself – it is nice to be humble – but if you were not brave – well you would not have taken any of your shots so far. but I do know what you mean – we have limits and then our comfort zones – but do watch the self-talk because sometimes we can be so self-defeating without realizing it – you know?
            and lastly, not sure what “true” photographer would be – but likely I would get tired of their work – ha!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Helen C says:

            Thank you, Yvette. (Strange thing… I saw your name listed in one email I received this morning from a friend I met in Italy. I don’t think many people have this name…) I am very touched by how you took time to write this comment to encourage me. THANK YOU!

            My comment of maybe I am not a true photographer, actually, doesn’t mean I look down on myself or I don’t have confidence. It is just that I want to figure out who I am before I can be who I am (make sense?). My definition for true photographer is someone who is willing to sacrifice a lot for taking photos (willingly and happily). In my case… I don’t usually spend time waiting for the right moment; I seldom get up early in the morning to take photos of sunrise… I love photographing, but I haven’t given up a lot to make photos.

            Knowing who I really am is a good feeling. No pressure. Just be myself 😉

            I plan to learn painting sometime. It’s on my list. 😉

            Have a great day!

            Like

  10. Engaging set of street photography…nicely captured.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Adhika says:

    The first reflection shot has potentials. What focal length did you use, Helen? I think it would make a really great abstract image.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen C says:

      95mm. Can I ask why did you ask? People usually ask about ISO, speed, or aperture. Is there a better focal length for a certain type of photo? I usually choose one that gives me the best composition I want. Or maybe you want to know the lens? Nikkor 24-120. Thanks.

      Like

      • Adhika says:

        Great question. SO/speed/aperture are just tools for you to achieve the correct exposure. Sure, certain aperture and certain speed would give different story (e.g. shallow DOF or smooth moving water, etc), but those make no sense to ask (at least for me) because I will not shoot at the same condition as you did. You shoot on a sunny day, I shoot at an overcast day. You shoot in the morning twilight, I shoot at high noon. What is the use of your ISO/speed/aperture combination in that case? I will probably overexpose/underexpose my image. Focal length, on the other hand, is different. Same subject will look different on different focal length. Some focal length makes you look fat, some focal length makes everything compressed, some focal length tighten up your shot, some focal length just gives you a wonderful bokeh, and so on and so forth. I often find myself asking the question, “How different will this picture look like if I shoot it at Xmm?”

        Liked by 1 person

        • Helen C says:

          Wow, I had no idea! Thanks for the lesson about focal length. I appreciate it. So if I want to try shooting at different focal length, do I stand at the same spot (the photo will look different)? I would like to test it out.

          Like

  12. Adhika says:

    I wish I have the time to put something like this together so I can take credit for it, but here is an e good example for this:

    http://photography.tutsplus.com/tutorials/exploring-how-focal-length-affects-images–photo-6508

    Observe how the girl looks the same size but see how near/far perspective are distorted by focal length selection. If you want to take similar shot, you have to get closer to the subject on the wide angle end, and you have to stand far from the subject on the tele end to achieve the same subject size.

    Also look at Section 3 from this: https://expertphotography.com/understand-focal-length-4-easy-steps/

    One of my favorite line about focal length is this:

    Many people think that wide angle lens or the ultra wide angle lens is made to fit a lot more into the image. It is not. It is for you to get closer to your subject.

    Liked by 1 person

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