Friday Fictioneers: Burned

Friday Fictioneers: Burned

Tell a complete story in 100 words or less based on the photo prompted.

PHOTO PROMPT -Copyright – Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

PHOTO PROMPT -Copyright – Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

When Dave demanded burning everything I had shared with Andy, I was upset. What is he thinking? Doesn’t he know it costs money to replace sofa, bed…?

I watched pieces of my past turning into ashes. My anger toward Dave, somehow, gradually disappeared. My marriage to Andy was a nightmare. Now, I felt free. I turned to Dave, wanting to hug and thank him.

“Now, we have to deal with things stored in your heart,” he said.

In the dark, his voice was cold and controlling, his eyes piercing.

I shivered. It all seemed too familiar.

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About Helen C

A retired computer programmer who loves writing and photographing, and has managed to publish a YA novel "Jin-Ling’s Two Left".
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48 Responses to Friday Fictioneers: Burned

  1. treerabold says:

    Powerful ending Helen!

    Like

  2. pambrittain says:

    A 100 word story isn’t easy, but you sail through with colors.

    Like

  3. That was wicked, in both senses of the word. I loved that ending.

    Like

  4. sunsetdragon says:

    I relate to this and hope that you are alright now.

    Like

  5. Elizabeth says:

    Hi Helen, great story! I think this lady isn’t safe with Dave, he can be worse than Andy.

    Like

  6. Sun says:

    love how you make us think your character finally has a safe place but as the story progresses, the true picture unfolds. great realistic story, Helen.

    Like

  7. Cee Neuner says:

    This is very good. I got shivers.

    Like

  8. I think the desire to burn everything should have warned her. This is not going to end well.

    janet

    Like

  9. Sue says:

    Nice! I was expecting sugar coated romance with the dialogue but you twisted it back with his voice tone.

    Like

  10. anupat says:

    People like Dave and Andy are psychos. Poor lady is always with wrong people.

    Like

  11. Dear Helen,

    Do I see a pattern here? Well constructed story with a novel written between the lines.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

    • Helen C says:

      Dear Rochelle,
      Thank you so much for providing the challenge, and visiting my blog. I had a lot of fun writing it and looking for words to delete so it would be 100 words. 😉 I am looking forward to your next challenge.
      Have a great day!
      Helen

      Like

  12. Muzzy says:

    G’day Helen,
    What a ripper, makes the blood run cold at the end, 🙂

    Like

  13. Nan Falkner says:

    Dear Helen, Wonderful – my mother used to say “Some people are just bad pickers.” I believe it too! He will only get worse! Good story!
    Nan 😉

    Like

    • Helen C says:

      Dear Nan, thank you so much for your comment. Your mom is absolutely right. 😉 Hmm… Is that the same as I always ended up waiting on the slowest line at bank, restaurant…? 😉 Thanks. Helen

      Like

  14. joannesisco says:

    Whoa – I didn’t see that coming! Great story.

    Like

  15. Helen, She seems to have chosen wrotng again. I hope she survives this man. Tragic. Well written. 🙂 —Susan

    Like

  16. This gave me a chill!
    Well done, Helen.

    Like

    • Helen C says:

      Thank you, teacher. I am sure there are some English mistakes, but… 😉 Helen

      Like

      • Ha! We all make them, for sure. I just checked an old blog comment I made on someone else’s blog and wondered, was I drunk when I wrote this?!?!? Mistakes by the gross! Ugh!
        You did good! 😉

        Like

        • Helen C says:

          You are so kind! Your students were lucky. Thank you! Helen

          Liked by 1 person

        • Helen C says:

          Good morning. I have a question… I received an email saying you liked my comment. But I don’t see “like” button in “comment section” in my blog on my screen. How did you like my comment since there is no “like” button? I want to like a comment from time to time, but not every blog has “like” button in comment. (I am not good with WordPress 😉 Thanks. Helen

          Liked by 1 person

          • Helen, I know of two ways. There may be more. I go to the notifications in wordpress.com or I go to my reader in wordpress and look at the blogs that way. I think there is almost always a like button there. I hope this helps. 🙂 If not let me know and I’ll try to figure something out.

            Like

          • Helen C says:

            Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! I got it! I don’t know why I never see that like in the reader 😉 And I have been wondering how did people do that for several months now. This made my day! Thank you so much! Helen

            Like

  17. a gray says:

    So short, but I feel as thought I have just watched the end of a horror film . . . knowing it isn’t really over.

    Like

    • Helen C says:

      Thanks, and good morning. I am fascinated by your blog. There are so much to absorb. I can’t imagine the time, effort you have put into it. You inspire me! Have a great day. Helen

      Like

      • a gray says:

        It may not be recognized as such, but it is a love story about people from a time seemingly so long ago that few can remember and even less would recognize..

        Like

        • Helen C says:

          Are you going to publish a book on this? It seems like you have everything for a book.
          It’s hard for people to know about your blog, I think. I believe JF is the one who mentioned your blog on his blog. Maybe talk to history center? Or give speeches?
          I think I have seen a similar blog long time ago, but I couldn’t remember it. It would be nice to know if what did the blogger do with his.
          Have a great day! Helen

          Like

          • a gray says:

            Wayne’s Journal will run through April next year. When that time comes, some sort of decision will have to be made, I suppose. Right now, though, the effort is to post his entries as they appear. This month, September, information regarding his bothers begins to appear as well as that related to his brothers-in-law. Not much, but enough to understand how deeply the war touched people’s lives. Since Tom Brokaw’s book, The Greatest Generation, a few years back, there has been much ado about those who served in the military during those times. That includes men who never left the Continental United States. Many who never went in harm’s way have been lionized. We have, or so it seems to me, forgotten they parents, wives and girl friends of those who served overseas in harm’s way.

            As far as publicizing Wayne’s Journal, please let people know about it. Thanks for your kind comments.

            Like

  18. loisajay says:

    Good gosh, Helen–I went from happy for the girl to fearing for her life. What a great story!

    Like

    • Helen C says:

      Thank you, Lois. One problem of being a writer is that you pretty much know the plot no matter whose story you are reading. don’t you feel that way sometime? 😉 Helen

      Like

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